Richard on Photography

While it is common to base notions of photographic art on capturing that “decisive moment”, I prefer to think about the photograph as a means of creative expression that is more than just a moment. The image is composed in a manner that turns the familiar into something more. The things we often take for granted have the potential to become a dream and a place where the mind may venture – a journey. The captured moment of reality becomes a place to explore, a path to realization, a spot of quiet solitude, rather than just a specific time and locale.

About Richard

Richard began pursuing photography in 1994 and is a self-taught photographer. His primary focus was originally black and white and color film photography, especially black and white infrared. He now uses a converted digital camera to capture infrared black and white images.

Richard has participated in several group exhibits in New York, Connecticut, Richmond and Santa Fe.  His photographs are in several corporate and private collections.  His Masters and Bachelor’s Degrees are from Queen’s University in political science and he had an alternate career in corporate communications that took him to St. Louis, New York City, Austin and Richmond.

He credits his friend John Hallum, whose dark room he originally learned in; Canadian artist, mentor and friend Dr. Jennifer Dickson, RA; and, his alchemist film printer, Richard Hobbs (who formerly printed for Robert Frank and Magnum agency photographers), for their mentoring along the way.

Infrared

A Different Perspective

Infrared photography captures light that people cannot see. Using a converted camera to capture infrared light, the resulting dreamlike view offers opportunities to look at the world we often take for granted in a slightly different manner.

It makes us question the textures of reality that are always there but often not touched. Infrared photographs become more than records of locales and times—they’re an expression of seeing the unseen and moments for reflection.

The Art of Printmaking

Richard creates his images and does his own processing in the “digital darkroom,” paying meticulous attention to detail for flawless prints. With years of experience as a print maker and his own professional printing equipment, Richard uses traditional pigment-based inks and chooses from a variety of fine papers—all of them archival quality— to find the perfect match for the subject.

The Art of Printmaking

Richard creates his images and does his own processing in the “digital darkroom,” paying meticulous attention to detail for flawless prints. With years of experience as a print maker and his own professional printing equipment, Richard uses traditional pigment-based inks and chooses from a variety of fine papers—all of them archival quality— to find the perfect match for the subject.

Richard Binhammer with a camera

Contact Richard

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